Reader Friday – The Promise

Patricia Bradley Reader Friday 27 Comments

 

Welcome back to the first Reader Friday of 2018! This past week I’ve read two books and The Promise by Susan Lantz Simpson is one of them and the one I’m talking about today. The other is Pam Hillman’s Promise of Breeze Hill. I’ll tell you what I think of it next week.

I don’t usually read Amish fiction, but I love to knit with Alpaca yarn and the story has Alpacas in it, so voila. Once I started reading, Susan Lantz Simpson’s writing quickly drew me into the story. And I fell in love with Phoebe and Benjamin and all of Phoebe’s family. The Promise was a wonderful and uplifting story.

When Phoebe Yoder’s baby sister was kidnapped, I felt Phoebe’s fear and guilt. And I understood why she uttered a vow to God that she shouldn’t have. I struggled along with her as she wrestled with this vow. Phoebe’s spunk made me chuckle at times, especially in her interactions with the man who pursued her.

And Benjamin Miller. He is a swoon-worthy hero. I love the way Simpson worked the alpacas into the story, and it was fascinating to read about the Amish way of life.

Whether you like Amish fiction or not, if you love a good story, then you’ll enjoy The Promise.

Blurb

Like most Amish young women, Phoebe Yoder has dreams—but not of a courtship—at least not yet. She dreams of caring for the tender-hearted alpacas at her Englischer neighbor’s farm, and learning the business herself. But that longing falls away the moment her baby sister goes missing. In that horrifying instant, desperate for her sister’s safe return, she whispers a promise to Gott: she will give up her dreams and marry Micah Graber, a man she doesn’t love, but who is determined to make her his wife.

Benjamin Miller hasn’t been back in Southern Maryland for long before he meets Phoebe and begins to imagine what a fine life they could build together—beginning with an alpaca farm of their own. But he can see that Phoebe’s brash vow is all she will consider, no matter what her heart wants. As Ben falls for her gentle manner and sweet, sad eyes, he comes to understand his daunting task: to convince Phoebe that together, they can make a new promise that will never be broken . . .

Do you read Amish fiction? Leave your answer in the comment section and I’ll enter you in a drawing for a gently-used book from my library.

Comments 27

  1. Anne L. Rightler

    I like Amish fiction. I like the simplicity of their lives and their faith in God. Thank you for sharing about this one. I don’t think I have read this author before.

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  2. Diane N

    I have read a few Amish books, but they just don’t really appeal to me. I am not quite sure why they don’t, but the fact still remains that I usually avoid that genre.

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      Patricia Bradley

      Diane, for me, it takes a really good writer to weave in the simple Amish ways and come up with a conflict for the book that works for the genre. Susan did that in The Promise. Thanks for stopping by!

  3. MH

    No Amish fiction. I have read a few, mostly because I was asked to review or edit them. I have nothing against Amish fiction; it’s just that I have a diverse range of reading interests and I can’t fathom adding another subgenre to what I’m reading already.

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  4. Jackie Smith

    I do read Amish fiction….not a lot but when I do I am always glad I read it! I have just collected the 3 books by Suzanne Woods Fisher (Amish Beginnings series) and am anxious to read them.

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  5. Edward Arrington

    I enjoy Amish fiction. I believe Beverly Lewis’s The Fiddler was the first one I read and have tried to read each of her new releases since. My wife and I had gone to Minnesota for my birthday in August 2012. She had just gotten interested in reading again and took two library books along to read. By the time we left the hotel for dinner the first evening, she had almost finished both books and wanted something else to read. We went to Barnes and Noble and bought two books – I think The Fiddler was one of them. That was Friday. By Sunday afternoon, she was finishing those books, so we saw a Barnes and Noble where we stopped and bought two more books. It was a good thing we were going home the next day or we would have had to ship the books home to avoid overcharges on our luggage. 🙂 I read the book the next month and have read Amish books by several other authors since then. As someone mentioned, the simple lifestyle has an appeal. although many Amish stories deal with some rather complicated matters.

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  6. Paula S.

    I don’t read much Amish Fiction. I have read a few good ones though. I prefer historical and suspense. Like another commenter said : too many books, so little time!

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  7. Rhonda

    I enjoy Amish fiction for the simplicity of their way of life and strong faith that is part of their life.. I say that but doing everything by hand and without electricity, cooking from scratch and working from sun up to sun down isn’t exactly simple is it? But there is something in that takes us out of the hustle and bustle and mindless busyness that we are often in doesn’t it? But I do find that the faith dilemmas are almost always the same in most books — usually a convict between the Amish and Englisher way of life, either romantically or morally, etc. But enter me anyway, I haven’t read one in a while and thanks for the chance Pat!!

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      Patricia Bradley

      Hi Rhonda! I do like reading about the simpler way of life–but I sure wouldn’t want to live it. lol. And if I draw your name, you can choose any of the books in my library. 🙂 Thanks for stopping by.

  8. Deb Smith

    My brother-in-law buys furniture from his Amish friend Ben. He carried us for a visit when I was sitting with his mom. We had such a great time. Enjoyed it.

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  9. Sue Parrish

    I read Amish fiction in between the contemporary, romantic suspense and mysteries. My favorite author of Amish fiction is Beth Wiseman. Her books are set in places I don’t think of as being typically Amish, such as Colorado or Montana. Their way of life is simple but difficult and one of their choosing. That takes courage. I like my creature comforts like TV and central heat/air. The book you reviewed sounds interesting. I will have to check it out. Please enter me in the drawing. Thanks.

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